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Advancing aged care: a systematic review of economic evaluations of workforce structures and care processes in a residential care setting

Overview of attention for article published in Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#43 of 160)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
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Title
Advancing aged care: a systematic review of economic evaluations of workforce structures and care processes in a residential care setting
Published in
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12962-016-0061-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tiffany Easton, Rachel Milte, Maria Crotty, Julie Ratcliffe

Abstract

Long-term care for older people is provided in both residential and non-residential settings, with residential settings tending to cater for individuals with higher care needs. Evidence relating to the costs and effectiveness of different workforce structures and care processes is important to facilitate the future planning of residential aged care services to promote high quality care and to enhance the quality of life of individuals living in residential care. A systematic review conducted up to December 2015 identified 19 studies containing an economic component; seven included a complete economic evaluation and 12 contained a cost analysis only. Key findings include the potential to create cost savings from a societal perspective through enhanced staffing levels and quality improvement interventions within residential aged care facilities, while integrated care models, including the integration of health disciplines and the integration between residents and care staff, were shown to have limited cost-saving potential. Six of the 19 identified studies examined dementia-specific structures and processes, in which person-centred interventions demonstrated the potential to reduce agitation and improve residents' quality of life. Importantly, this review highlights methodological limitations in the existing evidence and an urgent need for future research to identify appropriate and meaningful outcome measures that can be used at a service planning level.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 23%
Student > Master 11 18%
Other 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Librarian 4 6%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 19%
Psychology 7 11%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 5%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 12 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2017.
All research outputs
#1,966,837
of 9,159,176 outputs
Outputs from Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation
#43
of 160 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,188
of 311,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,159,176 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 160 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.