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Developing shared understandings of recovery and care: a qualitative study of women with eating disorders who resist therapeutic care

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Eating Disorders, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Developing shared understandings of recovery and care: a qualitative study of women with eating disorders who resist therapeutic care
Published in
Journal of Eating Disorders, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40337-016-0114-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Connie Musolino, Megan Warin, Tracey Wade, Peter Gilchrist

Abstract

This paper explores the differing perspectives of recovery and care of people with disordered eating. We consider the views of those who have not sought help for their disordered eating, or who have been given a diagnosis but have not engaged with health care services. Our aim is to demonstrate the importance of the cultural context of care and how this might shape people's perspectives of recovery and openness to receiving professional care. This study utilised a mixed methods approach of ethnographic fieldwork and psychological evaluation with 28 women from Adelaide, South Australia. Semi-structured interviews, observations, field notes and the Eating Disorder Examination were the primary forms of data collection. Data was analysed using thematic analysis. Participants in our study described how their disordered eating afforded them safety and were consistent with cultural values concerning healthy eating and gendered bodies. Disordered eating was viewed as a form of self-care, in which people protect and 'take care' of themselves. These subjectively experienced understandings of care underlie eating disorder behaviours and provide an obstacle in seeking any form of treatment that might lead to recovery. A shared understanding between patients and health professionals about the function of the eating disorder may avoid conflict and provide a pathway to treatment. These results suggest the construction of care by patients should not be taken for granted in therapeutic guidelines. A discussion considering how disordered eating practices are embedded in a matrix of care, health, eating and body practices may enhance the therapeutic relationship.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 30%
Student > Master 4 17%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Social Sciences 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,378,987
of 14,362,479 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Eating Disorders
#123
of 356 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,454
of 379,300 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Eating Disorders
#10
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,362,479 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 356 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 379,300 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.