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Street children and political violence: a socio-demographic analysis of street children in Rwanda

Overview of attention for article published in Child Abuse & Neglect, March 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
193 Mendeley
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Title
Street children and political violence: a socio-demographic analysis of street children in Rwanda
Published in
Child Abuse & Neglect, March 2003
DOI 10.1016/s0145-2134(03)00005-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Angela Veale, Giorgia Donà

Abstract

The aims were: (1) to examine the profile of African street children and to assess the link between street children in Africa and political violence; (2) to undertake a systematic examination of causal factors of street children in postgenocide Rwanda; and (3) to situate this analysis in the context of the socio-cultural and political impact of the genocide on Rwandan communities. Observational mapping examined the profile and activities of Rwandan street children. Structured interviews were carried out with 290 children in four regional towns to obtain information on socio-demographic, familial, educational background, causal factors surrounding street life involvement, psychological well-being, and relationship to the street. Focus group discussions and key informant interviews examined the relationship between street children and the broader Rwandan society. Street children in Rwanda were predominantly adolescent boys, almost half of whom were homeless (42%), with a high proportion of orphaned children or children who had lost at least one parent. Two variables predicted homelessness: child's guardian and reason for being in street. Qualitative accounts of children conveyed the impact of death of family members, repatriation, imprisonment of parents, and poverty on their lives. The analysis highlighted the need for community based support for children in alternative guardianship care and for policies to support the reintegration of male youths in postconflict welfare strategies as prevention strategies for street migration.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 193 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 189 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 14%
Researcher 23 12%
Student > Bachelor 20 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 6%
Other 38 20%
Unknown 42 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 67 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 11%
Psychology 22 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 3%
Other 21 11%
Unknown 47 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2005.
All research outputs
#5,609,060
of 17,363,630 outputs
Outputs from Child Abuse & Neglect
#1,452
of 2,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,763
of 397,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child Abuse & Neglect
#26
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,363,630 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,912 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,453 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.