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Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

Overview of attention for article published in Cell, May 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 9,051)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

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1057 Mendeley
citeulike
7 CiteULike
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Title
Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer
Published in
Cell, May 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2013.05.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Masahito Tachibana, Paula Amato, Michelle Sparman, Nuria Marti Gutierrez, Rebecca Tippner-Hedges, Hong Ma, Eunju Kang, Alimujiang Fulati, Hyo-Sang Lee, Hathaitip Sritanaudomchai, Keith Masterson, Janine Larson, Deborah Eaton, Karen Sadler-Fredd, David Battaglia, David Lee, Diana Wu, Jeffrey Jensen, Phillip Patton, Sumita Gokhale, Richard L. Stouffer, Don Wolf, Shoukhrat Mitalipov, Tachibana M, Amato P, Sparman M, Gutierrez NM, Tippner-Hedges R, Ma H, Kang E, Fulati A, Lee HS, Sritanaudomchai H, Masterson K, Larson J, Eaton D, Sadler-Fredd K, Battaglia D, Lee D, Wu D, Jensen J, Patton P, Gokhale S, Stouffer RL, Wolf D, Mitalipov S

Abstract

Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 323 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,057 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 39 4%
United Kingdom 17 2%
Germany 13 1%
Japan 11 1%
Spain 9 <1%
France 5 <1%
Italy 4 <1%
Russian Federation 4 <1%
India 3 <1%
Other 29 3%
Unknown 923 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 311 29%
Researcher 216 20%
Student > Bachelor 170 16%
Student > Master 145 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 46 4%
Other 169 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 699 66%
Medicine and Dentistry 117 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 106 10%
Engineering 38 4%
Chemistry 16 2%
Other 81 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1209. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,037
of 7,944,542 outputs
Outputs from Cell
#8
of 9,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10
of 120,348 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell
#1
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,944,542 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,051 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,348 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.