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Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, April 2006
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Title
Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, April 2006
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-1-12
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roger K Hall

Abstract

Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s) operating in utero about the 35th-38th day(s) from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F) at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis) is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18-22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Korea, Republic of 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 63 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 16%
Student > Postgraduate 10 15%
Other 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 22 33%
Unknown 4 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 70%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 9%
Psychology 3 4%
Computer Science 1 1%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 6 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2013.
All research outputs
#9,958,352
of 12,439,665 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#1,142
of 1,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,626
of 146,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#36
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,439,665 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,352 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 146,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.