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Sunlight, Vitamin D and Skin Cancer

Overview of attention for book
Cover of 'Sunlight, Vitamin D and Skin Cancer'

Table of Contents

  1. Altmetric Badge
    Book Overview
  2. Altmetric Badge
    Chapter 1 Sunlight, UV-radiation, vitamin D and skin cancer: how much sunlight do we need?
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    Chapter 2 Solar ultraviolet irradiance and cancer incidence and mortality.
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    Chapter 3 Vitamin D status and cancer incidence and mortality.
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    Chapter 4 Sun exposure and cancer survival in Norway: changes in the risk of death with season of diagnosis and latitude.
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    Chapter 5 Optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels for multiple health outcomes.
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    Chapter 6 Ultraviolet exposure scenarios: risks of erythema from recommendations on cutaneous vitamin D synthesis.
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    Chapter 7 At what time should one go out in the sun?
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    Chapter 8 Epidemiology of Melanoma and Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer—The Role of Sunlight
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    Chapter 9 Ultraviolet radiation and malignant melanoma.
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    Chapter 10 Solar UV exposure and mortality from skin tumors.
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    Chapter 11 Health Initiatives for the Prevention of Skin Cancer
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    Chapter 12 Sunscreens.
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    Chapter 13 UV damage and DNA repair in malignant melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
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    Chapter 14 Role of viruses in the development of squamous cell cancer and melanoma.
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    Chapter 15 Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers and the immune system.
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    Chapter 16 Solar UV-radiation, vitamin D and skin cancer surveillance in organ transplant recipients (OTRs).
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    Chapter 17 Histology of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
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    Chapter 18 Sunlight, Vitamin D and Skin Cancer
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    Chapter 19 Molecular biology of basal and squamous cell carcinomas.
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    Chapter 20 Molecular biology of malignant melanoma.
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    Chapter 21 P53 protein and pathogenesis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
  23. Altmetric Badge
    Chapter 22 Apoptosis and pathogenesis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
  24. Altmetric Badge
    Chapter 23 Treatment of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
Attention for Chapter 7: At what time should one go out in the sun?
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#33 of 3,777)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
53 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
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1 Connotea
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Chapter title
At what time should one go out in the sun?
Chapter number 7
Book title
Sunlight, Vitamin D and Skin Cancer
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2008
DOI 10.1007/978-0-387-77574-6_7
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-0-387-77573-9, 978-0-387-77574-6
Authors

Johan Moan, Arne Dahlback, Alina Carmen Porojnicu, Moan, Johan, Dahlback, Arne, Porojnicu, Alina Carmen

Editors

Jörg Reichrath

Abstract

To get an optimal vitamin D supplement from the sun at a minimal risk of getting cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), the best time of sun exposure is noon. Thus, common health recommendations given by authorities in many countries, that sun exposure should be avoided for three to five hours around noon and postponed to the afternoon, may be wrong and may even promote CMM. The reasons for this are (1) The action spectrum for CMM is likely to be centered at longer wavelengths (UVA, ultraviolet A, 320-400 nm) than that of vitamin D generation (UVB, ultraviolet B, 280-320 nm). (2) Scattering of solar radiation on clear days is caused by small scattering elements, Rayleigh dominated and increases with decreasing wavelengths. A larger fraction of UVA than of UVB comes directly and unscattered from the sun. (3) The human body can be more realistically represented by a vertical cylinder than by a horizontal, planar surface, as done in almost all calculations in the literature. With the cylinder model, high UVA fluence rates last about twice as long after noon as high UVB fluence rates do. In view of this, short, nonerythemogenic exposures around noon should be recommended rather than longer nonerythemogenic exposures in the afternoon. This would give a maximal yield of vitamin D at a minimal CMM risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 29%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Professor 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Computer Science 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 67. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 October 2020.
All research outputs
#359,838
of 16,603,833 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#33
of 3,777 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,473
of 93,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,603,833 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,777 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 93,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them