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Is the shock index based classification of hypovolemic shock applicable in multiple injured patients with severe traumatic brain injury?—an analysis of the TraumaRegister DGU®

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, December 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Is the shock index based classification of hypovolemic shock applicable in multiple injured patients with severe traumatic brain injury?—an analysis of the TraumaRegister DGU®
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13049-016-0340-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthias Fröhlich, Arne Driessen, Andreas Böhmer, Ulrike Nienaber, Alhadi Igressa, Christian Probst, Bertil Bouillon, Marc Maegele, Manuel Mutschler

Abstract

A new classification of hypovolemic shock based on the shock index (SI) was proposed in 2013. This classification contains four classes of shock and shows good correlation with acidosis, blood product need and mortality. Since their applicability was questioned, the aim of this study was to verify the validity of the new classification in multiple injured patients with traumatic brain injury. Between 2002 and 2013, data from 40 888 patients from the TraumaRegister DGU(®) were analysed. Patients were classified according to their initial SI at hospital admission (Class I: SI < 0.6, class II: SI ≥0.6 to <1.0, class III SI ≥1.0 to <1.4, class IV: SI ≥1.4). Patients with an additional severe TBI (AIS ≥ 3) were compared to patients without severe TBI. 16,760 multiple injured patients with TBI (AIShead ≥3) were compared to 24,128 patients without severe TBI. With worsening of SI class, mortality rate increased from 20 to 53% in TBI patients. Worsening SI classes were associated with decreased haemoglobin, platelet counts and Quick's values. The number of blood units transfused correlated with worsening of SI. Massive transfusion rates increased from 3% in class I to 46% in class IV. The accuracy for predicting transfusion requirements did not differ between TBI and Non TBI patients. The use of the SI based classification enables a quick assessment of patients in hypovolemic shock based on universally available parameters. Although the pathophysiology in TBI and Non TBI patients and early treatment methods such as the use of vasopressors differ, both groups showed an identical probability of recieving blood products within the respective SI class. Regardless of the presence of TBI, the classification of hypovolemic shock based on the SI enables a fast and reliable assessment of hypovolemic shock in the emergency department. Therefore, the presented study supports the SI as a feasible tool to assess patients at risk for blood product transfusions, even in the presence of severe TBI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Researcher 5 11%
Other 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 11 24%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 64%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 11 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2019.
All research outputs
#2,697,459
of 14,563,907 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#268
of 905 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,840
of 375,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#45
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,563,907 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 905 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 375,924 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.