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The genome of the Gulf pipefish enables understanding of evolutionary innovations

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
77 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
60 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
101 Mendeley
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Title
The genome of the Gulf pipefish enables understanding of evolutionary innovations
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13059-016-1126-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. M. Small, S. Bassham, J. Catchen, A. Amores, A. M. Fuiten, R. S. Brown, A. G. Jones, W. A. Cresko

Abstract

Evolutionary origins of derived morphologies ultimately stem from changes in protein structure, gene regulation, and gene content. A well-assembled, annotated reference genome is a central resource for pursuing these molecular phenomena underlying phenotypic evolution. We explored the genome of the Gulf pipefish (Syngnathus scovelli), which belongs to family Syngnathidae (pipefishes, seahorses, and seadragons). These fishes have dramatically derived bodies and a remarkable novelty among vertebrates, the male brood pouch. We produce a reference genome, condensed into chromosomes, for the Gulf pipefish. Gene losses and other changes have occurred in pipefish hox and dlx clusters and in the tbx and pitx gene families, candidate mechanisms for the evolution of syngnathid traits, including an elongated axis and the loss of ribs, pelvic fins, and teeth. We measure gene expression changes in pregnant versus non-pregnant brood pouch tissue and characterize the genomic organization of duplicated metalloprotease genes (patristacins) recruited into the function of this novel structure. Phylogenetic inference using ultraconserved sequences provides an alternative hypothesis for the relationship between orders Syngnathiformes and Scombriformes. Comparisons of chromosome structure among percomorphs show that chromosome number in a pipefish ancestor became reduced via chromosomal fusions. The collected findings from this first syngnathid reference genome open a window into the genomic underpinnings of highly derived morphologies, demonstrating that de novo production of high quality and useful reference genomes is within reach of even small research groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 77 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Unknown 98 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 23%
Student > Master 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 18 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 28%
Environmental Science 3 3%
Engineering 2 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 <1%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 24 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 140. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2021.
All research outputs
#241,577
of 22,512,774 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#112
of 4,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,304
of 423,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#15
of 261 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,512,774 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,087 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 423,434 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 261 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.