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Growth rate and resource imbalance interactively control biomass stoichiometry and elemental quotas of aquatic bacteria

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
Title
Growth rate and resource imbalance interactively control biomass stoichiometry and elemental quotas of aquatic bacteria
Published in
Ecology, March 2017
DOI 10.1002/ecy.1705
Pubmed ID
Authors

Casey M. Godwin, Emily A. Whitaker, James B. Cotner

Abstract

The effects of resource stoichiometry and growth rate on the elemental composition of biomass have been examined in a wide variety of organisms, but the interaction among these effects is often overlooked. To determine how growth rate and resource imbalance affect bacterial carbon (C): nitrogen (N): phosphorus (P) stoichiometry and elemental content, we cultured two strains of aquatic heterotrophic bacteria in chemostats at a range of dilution rates and P supply levels (C:P of 100:1 to 10,000:1). When growing below 50% of their maximum growth rate, P availability and dilution rate had strong interactive effects on biomass C:N:P, elemental quotas, cell size, respiration rate, and growth efficiency. In contrast, at faster growth rates, biomass stoichiometry was strongly homeostatic in both strains (C:N:P of 70:13:1 and 73:14:1) and elemental quotas of C, N, and P were tightly coupled (but not constant). Respiration and cell size increased with both growth rate and P limitation, and P limitation induced C accumulation and excess respiration. These results show that bacterial biomass stoichiometry is relatively constrained when all resources are abundant and growth rates are high, but at low growth rates resource imbalance is relatively more important than growth rate in controlling bacterial biomass composition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 8%
Poland 1 2%
Unknown 44 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Master 8 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 27%
Environmental Science 13 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 10%
Unspecified 3 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,413,474
of 15,059,303 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#820
of 5,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,443
of 380,768 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#17
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,059,303 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,585 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 380,768 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.