↓ Skip to main content

Algal polycultures enhance coproduct recycling from hydrothermal liquefaction

Overview of attention for article published in Bioresource Technology, January 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
Algal polycultures enhance coproduct recycling from hydrothermal liquefaction
Published in
Bioresource Technology, January 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2016.11.105
Pubmed ID
Authors

Casey M. Godwin, David C. Hietala, Aubrey R. Lashaway, Anita Narwani, Phillip E. Savage, Bradley J. Cardinale

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine if polycultures of algae could enhance tolerance to aqueous-phase coproduct (ACP) from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of algal biomass to produce biocrude. The growth of algal monocultures and polycultures was characterized across a range ACP concentrations and sources. All of the monocultures were either killed or inhibited by 2% ACP, but polycultures of the same species were viable at up to 10%. The addition of ACP increased the growth rate (up to 25%) and biomass production (53%) of polycultures, several of which were more productive in ACP than any monoculture was in the presence or absence of ACP. These results suggest that a cultivation process that applies biodiversity to nutrient recycling could produce more algae with less fertilizer consumption.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 26%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 26%
Engineering 6 13%
Environmental Science 4 9%
Chemical Engineering 3 7%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 17 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2016.
All research outputs
#6,785,899
of 12,273,821 outputs
Outputs from Bioresource Technology
#2,481
of 4,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,174
of 336,170 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bioresource Technology
#16
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,273,821 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,372 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 336,170 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.