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Between individualism and social solidarity in vaccination policy: the case of the 2013 OPV campaign in Israel

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, December 2016
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Between individualism and social solidarity in vaccination policy: the case of the 2013 OPV campaign in Israel
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13584-016-0119-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hagai Boas, Anat Rosenthal, Nadav Davidovitch

Abstract

During the summer of 2013, after samples of poliomyelitis virus were found in sewage, Israel launched an intensive national oral polio vaccine (OPV) campaign. The clinical objective of the campaign was rather clear. With not a single case of infantile paralysis and with a population already highly protected with IPV (a dead version of the vaccine), the goal was to foster collective immunity so that risk populations could also be protected. This, however, entailed a rather unusual issue: how to persuade parents whose children already received an IPV to re-vaccinate their children, now with a live yet attenuated version of the virus that was excluded from the national vaccination program in 2004. The challenge therefore was a call for social solidarity - asking parents to vaccinate their children mainly for the sake of protecting unknown at risk populations and to take part in the larger global goals of the polio eradication program. This challenge stands at the core of our investigation. We see the OPV campaign of summer 2013 as a good case study of the tension between individualism and social solidarity in seeking the cooperation of the public. We draw on a qualitative study that included participant observation, document reviews and interviews with policy-makers, parents, journalists, public health experts and community leaders. These data were analyzed in order to unravel the ways in which self-interest, community and solidarity were conceived by different agents during the vaccination campaign. The family as a metaphor for social solidarity was the main discursive item in the public campaign. Tensions, dissonances and inconsistencies were found between different registers and agencies as to what is at stake and what is required. We discuss the ethical and social implications of our findings in order to better understand how persuasion was used in the current case and for its future role in similar events, within and outside Israel, when global efforts to eradicate polio are ongoing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 33%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Librarian 1 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 17%
Psychology 3 13%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 8%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 6 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2017.
All research outputs
#4,257,201
of 8,840,878 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#88
of 241 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,262
of 302,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#7
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,840,878 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 241 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,091 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.