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Secondary analysis of data can inform care delivery for Indigenous women in an acute mental health inpatient unit

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, December 2016
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Secondary analysis of data can inform care delivery for Indigenous women in an acute mental health inpatient unit
Published in
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, December 2016
DOI 10.1111/inm.12289
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pat Bradley, Teresa Cunningham, Anne Lowell, Tricia Nagel, Sandra Dunn

Abstract

There is a paucity of research exploring Indigenous women's experiences in acute mental health inpatient services in Australia. Even less is known of Indigenous women's experience of seclusion events, as published data are rarely disaggregated by both indigeneity and gender. This research used secondary analysis of pre-existing datasets to identify any quantifiable difference in recorded experience between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, and between Indigenous women and Indigenous men in an acute mental health inpatient unit. Standard separation data of age, length of stay, legal status, and discharge diagnosis were analysed, as were seclusion register data of age, seclusion grounds, and number of seclusion events. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data, and where warranted, inferential statistical methods used SPSS software to apply analysis of variance/multivariate analysis of variance testing. The results showed evidence that secondary analysis of existing datasets can provide a rich source of information to describe the experience of target groups, and to guide service planning and delivery of individualized, culturally-secure mental health care at a local level. The results are discussed, service and policy development implications are explored, and suggestions for further research are offered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Other 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 8 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 5 23%
Psychology 4 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Unknown 9 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2018.
All research outputs
#12,155,216
of 20,758,119 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
#1,060
of 1,263 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,726
of 413,062 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
#24
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,758,119 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,263 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 413,062 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.