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A randomised controlled trial of sensory awareness training and additional motor practice for learning scalpel skills in podiatry students

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, December 2016
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Title
A randomised controlled trial of sensory awareness training and additional motor practice for learning scalpel skills in podiatry students
Published in
BMC Medical Education, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0817-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryan S Causby, Michelle N McDonnell, Lloyd Reed, Susan L Hillier

Abstract

The process of using a scalpel, like all other motor activities, is dependent upon the successful integration of afferent (sensory), cognitive and efferent (motor) processes. During learning of these skills, even if motor practice is carefully monitored there is still an inherent risk involved. It is also possible that this strategy could reinforce high levels of anxiety experienced by the student and affect student self-efficacy, causing detrimental effects on motor learning. An alternative training strategy could be through targeting sensory rather than motor processes. Second year podiatry students who were about to commence learning scalpel skills were recruited. Participants were randomly allocated into sensory awareness training (Sensory), additional motor practice (Motor) or usual teaching only (Control) groups. Participants were then evaluated on psychological measures (Intrinsic Motivation Inventory) and dexterity measures (Purdue Pegboard, Grooved Pegboard Test and a grip-lift task). A total of 44 participants were included in the study. There were no baseline differences or significant differences between the three groups over time on the Perceived Competence, Effort/ Importance or Pressure/ Tension, psychological measures. All groups showed a significant increase in Perceived Competence over time (F1,41 = 13.796, p = 0.001). Only one variable for the grip-lift task (Preload Duration for the non-dominant hand) showed a significant difference over time between the groups (F2,41 = 3.280, p = 0.038), specifically, Motor and Control groups. The use of sensory awareness training, or additional motor practice did not provide a more effective alternative compared with usual teaching. Further research may be warranted using more engaged training, provision of supervision and greater participant numbers. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12616001428459 . Registered 13(th) October 2016. Registered Retrospectively.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 24%
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Lecturer 2 6%
Other 8 24%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Sports and Recreations 4 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2016.
All research outputs
#7,646,446
of 8,815,676 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#1,236
of 1,361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#245,528
of 300,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#45
of 51 outputs
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