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Space Use and Habitat Selection by Resident and Transient Red Wolves (Canis rufus)

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, December 2016
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Title
Space Use and Habitat Selection by Resident and Transient Red Wolves (Canis rufus)
Published in
PLOS ONE, December 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0167603
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph W. Hinton, Christine Proctor, Marcella J. Kelly, Frank T. van Manen, Michael R. Vaughan, Michael J. Chamberlain

Abstract

Recovery of large carnivores remains a challenge because complex spatial dynamics that facilitate population persistence are poorly understood. In particular, recovery of the critically endangered red wolf (Canis rufus) has been challenging because of its vulnerability to extinction via human-caused mortality and hybridization with coyotes (Canis latrans). Therefore, understanding red wolf space use and habitat selection is important to assist recovery because key aspects of wolf ecology such as interspecific competition, foraging, and habitat selection are well-known to influence population dynamics and persistence. During 2009-2011, we used global positioning system (GPS) radio-telemetry to quantify space use and 3rd-order habitat selection for resident and transient red wolves on the Albemarle Peninsula of eastern North Carolina. The Albemarle Peninsula was a predominantly agricultural landscape in which red wolves maintained spatially stable home ranges that varied between 25 km2 and 190 km2. Conversely, transient red wolves did not maintain home ranges and traversed areas between 122 km2 and 681 km2. Space use by transient red wolves was not spatially stable and exhibited shifting patterns until residency was achieved by individual wolves. Habitat selection was similar between resident and transient red wolves in which agricultural habitats were selected over forested habitats. However, transients showed stronger selection for edges and roads than resident red wolves. Behaviors of transient wolves are rarely reported in studies of space use and habitat selection because of technological limitations to observed extensive space use and because they do not contribute reproductively to populations. Transients in our study comprised displaced red wolves and younger dispersers that competed for limited space and mating opportunities. Therefore, our results suggest that transiency is likely an important life-history strategy for red wolves that facilitates metapopulation dynamics through short- and long-distance movements and eventual replacement of breeding residents lost to mortality.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 71 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Student > Master 7 10%
Other 5 7%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 16 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 40%
Environmental Science 14 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Unspecified 2 3%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 17 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2016.
All research outputs
#16,556,653
of 20,585,116 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#138,152
of 177,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#300,428
of 411,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#3,947
of 5,273 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,585,116 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 177,664 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 411,535 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,273 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.