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The dual effect of mscs on tumour growth and tumour angiogenesis

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, May 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 351)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
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Title
The dual effect of mscs on tumour growth and tumour angiogenesis
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, May 2013
DOI 10.1186/scrt195
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kéramidas M, de Fraipont F, Karageorgis A, Moisan A, Persoons V, Richard MJ, Coll JL, Rome C

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Understanding the multiple biological functions played by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as well as their development as therapeutics in regenerative medicine or in cancer treatment are major fields of research. Indeed, it has been established that hMSCs play a central role in the pathogenesis and progression of tumours, but their impact on tumour growth remains controversial. METHODS: In this study, we investigated the influence of hMSCs on the growth of pre-established tumours. We engrafted nude mice with luciferase-positive mouse adenocarcinoma cells (TSA-Luc+) to obtain subcutaneous or lung tumours. When tumour presence was confirmed by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging, hMSCs were injected into the periphery of the SC tumours or delivered by systemic intravenous injection in mice bearing either SC tumours or lung metastasis. RESULTS: Regardless of the tumour model and mode of hMSC injection, hMSC administration was always associated with decreased tumour growth due to an inhibition of tumour cell proliferation, likely resulting from deep modifications of the tumour angiogenesis. Indeed, we established that although hMSCs can induce the formation of new blood vessels in a non-tumoural cellulose sponge model in mice, they do not modify the overall amount of haemoglobin delivered into the SC tumours or lung metastasis. We observed that these tumour vessels were reduced in number but were longer. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that hMSCs injection decreased solid tumour growth in mice and modified tumour vasculature, which confirms hMSCs could be interesting to use for the treatment of pre-established tumours.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Unknown 41 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 28%
Researcher 9 21%
Student > Master 9 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 12%
Engineering 2 5%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2014.
All research outputs
#275,910
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#13
of 351 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,155
of 89,627 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,509 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 351 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 89,627 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.