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An Ethical Framework for Automated, Wearable Cameras in Health Behavior Research

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Preventive Medicine, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
100 Mendeley
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Title
An Ethical Framework for Automated, Wearable Cameras in Health Behavior Research
Published in
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, February 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.11.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kelly P, Marshall SJ, Badland H, Kerr J, Oliver M, Doherty AR, Foster C, Paul Kelly, Simon J. Marshall, Hannah Badland, Jacqueline Kerr, Melody Oliver, Aiden R. Doherty, Charlie Foster

Abstract

Technologic advances mean automated, wearable cameras are now feasible for investigating health behaviors in a public health context. This paper attempts to identify and discuss the ethical implications of such research, in relation to existing guidelines for ethical research in traditional visual methodologies. Research using automated, wearable cameras can be very intrusive, generating unprecedented levels of image data, some of it potentially unflattering or unwanted. Participants and third parties they encounter may feel uncomfortable or that their privacy has been affected negatively. This paper attempts to formalize the protection of all according to best ethical principles through the development of an ethical framework. Respect for autonomy, through appropriate approaches to informed consent and adequate privacy and confidentiality controls, allows for ethical research, which has the potential to confer substantial benefits on the field of health behavior research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 4%
United States 3 3%
Spain 2 2%
France 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Saudi Arabia 1 1%
Unknown 88 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 28%
Researcher 19 19%
Student > Master 15 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 8%
Other 22 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 22 22%
Social Sciences 15 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 15%
Unspecified 11 11%
Psychology 9 9%
Other 28 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2015.
All research outputs
#520,155
of 10,439,040 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Preventive Medicine
#543
of 2,921 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,402
of 130,492 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Preventive Medicine
#8
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,439,040 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,921 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 130,492 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.