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Transcriptomic imprints of adaptation to fresh water: parallel evolution of osmoregulatory gene expression in the Alewife

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, January 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 tweeters

Citations

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40 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
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Title
Transcriptomic imprints of adaptation to fresh water: parallel evolution of osmoregulatory gene expression in the Alewife
Published in
Molecular Ecology, January 2017
DOI 10.1111/mec.13983
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan P. Velotta, Jill L. Wegrzyn, Samuel Ginzburg, Lin Kang, Sergiusz Czesny, Rachel J. O'Neill, Stephen D. McCormick, Pawel Michalak, Eric T. Schultz

Abstract

Comparative approaches in physiological genomics offer an opportunity to understand the functional importance of genes involved in niche exploitation. We used populations of Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) to explore the transcriptional mechanisms that underlie adaptation to fresh water. Ancestrally anadromous Alewives have recently formed multiple, independently derived, landlocked populations, which exhibit reduced tolerance of saltwater and enhanced tolerance of fresh water. Using RNA-seq, we compared transcriptional responses of an anadromous Alewife population to two landlocked populations after acclimation to fresh (0 ppt)- and salt-water (35 ppt). Our results suggest that the gill transcriptome has evolved in primarily discordant ways between independent landlocked populations and their anadromous ancestor. By contrast, evolved shifts in the transcription of a small suite of well-characterized osmoregulatory genes exhibited a strong degree of parallelism. In particular, transcription of genes that regulate gill ion exchange has diverged in accordance with functional predictions: fresh water ion uptake genes (most notably, the 'freshwater paralog' of Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase α -subunit) were more highly expressed in landlocked forms, whereas genes that regulate saltwater ion secretion (e.g., the 'saltwater paralog' of NKAα) exhibited a blunted response to saltwater. Parallel divergence of ion-transport gene expression is associated with shifts in salinity tolerance limits among landlocked forms, suggesting that changes to the gill's transcriptional response to salinity facilitates fresh water adaptation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Unknown 54 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 25%
Researcher 14 25%
Student > Master 10 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 4%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 57%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 27%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2017.
All research outputs
#2,265,720
of 18,981,499 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#1,397
of 5,656 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,586
of 402,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#34
of 104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,981,499 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,656 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 402,771 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.