↓ Skip to main content

Gene expression signature of fibroblast serum response predicts human cancer progression: similarities between tumors and wounds.

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Biology, January 2004
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
patent
1 patent
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
355 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
connotea
3 Connotea
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Gene expression signature of fibroblast serum response predicts human cancer progression: similarities between tumors and wounds.
Published in
PLoS Biology, January 2004
DOI 10.1371/journal.pbio.0020007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chang HY, Sneddon JB, Alizadeh AA, Sood R, West RB, Montgomery K, Chi JT, van de Rijn M, Botstein D, Brown PO, Howard Y Chang, Julie B Sneddon, Ash A Alizadeh, Ruchira Sood, Rob B West, Kelli Montgomery, Jen-Tsan Chi, Matt van de Rijn, David Botstein, Patrick O Brown, Edison T. Liu

Abstract

Cancer invasion and metastasis have been likened to wound healing gone awry. Despite parallels in cellular behavior between cancer progression and wound healing, the molecular relationships between these two processes and their prognostic implications are unclear. In this study, based on gene expression profiles of fibroblasts from ten anatomic sites, we identify a stereotyped gene expression program in response to serum exposure that appears to reflect the multifaceted role of fibroblasts in wound healing. The genes comprising this fibroblast common serum response are coordinately regulated in many human tumors, allowing us to identify tumors with gene expression signatures suggestive of active wounds. Genes induced in the fibroblast serum-response program are expressed in tumors by the tumor cells themselves, by tumor-associated fibroblasts, or both. The molecular features that define this wound-like phenotype are evident at an early clinical stage, persist during treatment, and predict increased risk of metastasis and death in breast, lung, and gastric carcinomas. Thus, the transcriptional signature of the response of fibroblasts to serum provides a possible link between cancer progression and wound healing, as well as a powerful predictor of the clinical course in several common carcinomas.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 355 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 8 2%
United States 8 2%
Germany 6 2%
Brazil 2 <1%
India 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Slovakia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Other 9 3%
Unknown 316 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 114 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 83 23%
Student > Master 36 10%
Professor 24 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 22 6%
Other 76 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 155 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 79 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 50 14%
Unspecified 18 5%
Engineering 14 4%
Other 39 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2014.
All research outputs
#721,948
of 9,400,242 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Biology
#1,486
of 3,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,471
of 127,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Biology
#32
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,400,242 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,475 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 43.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 127,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.