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Low vitamin D deficiency in Irish toddlers despite northerly latitude and a high prevalence of inadequate intakes

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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11 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Low vitamin D deficiency in Irish toddlers despite northerly latitude and a high prevalence of inadequate intakes
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, December 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00394-016-1368-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carol ní Chaoimh, Elaine K. McCarthy, Jonathan O’B. Hourihane, Louise C. Kenny, Alan D. Irvine, Deirdre M. Murray, Mairead E. Kiely

Abstract

While reports of inadequate vitamin D intakes among young children are widespread, data on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency are inconsistent. We aimed to quantify vitamin D intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations in children aged 2 years in the prospective Cork BASELINE Birth Cohort Study. Serum 25(OH)D was analysed using UPLC-MS/MS in 741 children living in Cork, Ireland (51°N). Two-day weighed food diaries were collected in 467 children, and 294 provided both a blood sample and a food diary. Mean (SD) 25(OH)D concentrations were 63.4 (20.4) nmol/L [winter: 54.5 (19.9), summer: 71.2 (17.5)]. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (<30 nmol/L) was 4.6, and 26.7% were <50 nmol/L [45.2% during winter (November-April) and 10.4% in summer (May-October)]. With a mean (SD) vitamin D intake of 3.5 (3.1) µg/day, 96% had intakes below 10 µg/day, the current IOM estimated average requirement and the SACN safe intake value for this age group. After adjustment for season, vitamin D intake (µg/day) was associated with higher 25(OH)D concentrations [adjusted estimate (95% CI) 2.5 (1.9, 3.1) nmol/L]. Children who did not consume vitamin D-fortified foods or supplements had very low vitamin D intakes (1.2 (0.9) µg/day), and during winter, 12 and 77% were <30 and <50 nmol/L, respectively, compared with 6 and 44% of fortified food consumers. There was a high prevalence of low vitamin D status during winter, especially among children who did not consume fortified foods or nutritional supplements. Our data indicate the need for dietary strategies to increase vitamin D intakes in this age group. This report provides further evidence that DRVs for vitamin D should be based on experimental data in specific population groups and indicates the need for dose-response RCTs in young children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Other 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 11 27%
Unknown 9 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 10 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2018.
All research outputs
#2,717,945
of 15,082,829 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#539
of 1,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,332
of 382,174 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#15
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,082,829 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,663 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 382,174 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.