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Dynamic properties of independent chromatin domains measured by correlation spectroscopy in living cells

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 492)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
26 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
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Title
Dynamic properties of independent chromatin domains measured by correlation spectroscopy in living cells
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13072-016-0093-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Malte Wachsmuth, Tobias A. Knoch, Karsten Rippe

Abstract

Genome organization into subchromosomal topologically associating domains (TADs) is linked to cell-type-specific gene expression programs. However, dynamic properties of such domains remain elusive, and it is unclear how domain plasticity modulates genomic accessibility for soluble factors. Here, we combine and compare a high-resolution topology analysis of interacting chromatin loci with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements of domain dynamics in single living cells. We identify topologically and dynamically independent chromatin domains of ~1 Mb in size that are best described by a loop-cluster polymer model. Hydrodynamic relaxation times and gyration radii of domains are larger for open (161 ± 15 ms, 297 ± 9 nm) than for dense chromatin (88 ± 7 ms, 243 ± 6 nm) and increase globally upon chromatin hyperacetylation or ATP depletion. Based on the domain structure and dynamics measurements, we propose a loop-cluster model for chromatin domains. It suggests that the regulation of chromatin accessibility for soluble factors displays a significantly stronger dependence on factor concentration than search processes within a static network.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Lithuania 1 2%
Unknown 54 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 30%
Researcher 10 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Master 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 20%
Physics and Astronomy 9 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 11 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2017.
All research outputs
#997,707
of 17,392,251 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#16
of 492 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,000
of 394,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#4
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,392,251 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 492 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 394,741 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.