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Identifying people at higher risk of melanoma across the U.K.: a primary-care-based electronic survey

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Dermatology, December 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Identifying people at higher risk of melanoma across the U.K.: a primary-care-based electronic survey
Published in
British Journal of Dermatology, December 2016
DOI 10.1111/bjd.15181
Pubmed ID
Authors

J.A. Usher-Smith, A.P. Kassianos, J.D. Emery, G.A. Abel, Z. Teoh, S. Hall, R.D. Neal, P. Murchie, F.M. Walter

Abstract

Melanoma incidence is rising rapidly worldwide among white populations. Defining higher-risk populations using risk prediction models may help targeted screening and early detection approaches. To assess the feasibility of identifying people at higher risk of melanoma using the Williams self-assessed clinical risk estimation model in U.K. primary care. We recruited participants from the waiting rooms of 22 general practices covering a total population of > 240 000 in three U.K. regions: Eastern England, North East Scotland and North Wales. Participants completed an electronic questionnaire using tablet computers. The main outcome was the mean melanoma risk score using the Williams melanoma risk model. Of 9004 people approached, 7742 (86%) completed the electronic questionnaire. The mean melanoma risk score for the 7566 eligible participants was 17·15 ± 8·51, with small regional differences [lower in England compared with Scotland (P = 0·001) and Wales (P < 0·001), mainly due to greater freckling and childhood sunburn among Scottish and Welsh participants]. After weighting to the age and sex distribution, different potential cut-offs would allow between 4% and 20% of the population to be identified as higher risk, and those groups would contain 30% and 60%, respectively of those likely to develop melanoma. Collecting data on the melanoma risk profile of the general population in U.K. primary care is both feasible and acceptable for patients in a general practice setting, and provides opportunities for new methods of real-time risk assessment and risk stratified cancer interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 26%
Other 4 17%
Professor 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Other 5 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 48%
Unspecified 4 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2018.
All research outputs
#6,758,685
of 13,044,081 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Dermatology
#3,471
of 6,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,494
of 370,020 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Dermatology
#51
of 135 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,044,081 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,353 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 370,020 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 135 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.