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Harnessing Bacterial Signals for Suppression of Biofilm Formation in the Nosocomial Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Microbiology, December 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Harnessing Bacterial Signals for Suppression of Biofilm Formation in the Nosocomial Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus
Published in
Frontiers in Microbiology, December 2016
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2016.02074
Pubmed ID
Authors

F. Jerry Reen, John P. Phelan, David F. Woods, Rachel Shanahan, Rafael Cano, Sarah Clarke, Gerard P. McGlacken, Fergal O’Gara

Abstract

Faced with the continued emergence of antibiotic resistance to all known classes of antibiotics, a paradigm shift in approaches toward antifungal therapeutics is required. Well characterized in a broad spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens, biofilms are a key factor in limiting the effectiveness of conventional antibiotics. Therefore, therapeutics such as small molecules that prevent or disrupt biofilm formation would render pathogens susceptible to clearance by existing drugs. This is the first report describing the effect of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkylhydroxyquinolone interkingdom signal molecules 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone and 2-heptyl-4-quinolone on biofilm formation in the important fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Decoration of the anthranilate ring on the quinolone framework resulted in significant changes in the capacity of these chemical messages to suppress biofilm formation. Addition of methoxy or methyl groups at the C5-C7 positions led to retention of anti-biofilm activity, in some cases dependent on the alkyl chain length at position C2. In contrast, halogenation at either the C3 or C6 positions led to loss of activity, with one notable exception. Microscopic staining provided key insights into the structural impact of the parent and modified molecules, identifying lead compounds for further development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Professor 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 8 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 27%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Psychology 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 9 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2016.
All research outputs
#6,731,356
of 8,834,354 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Microbiology
#5,368
of 6,925 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#213,009
of 302,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Microbiology
#855
of 1,225 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,834,354 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,925 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,393 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,225 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.