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Geography and host species shape the evolutionary dynamics of U genogroup infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

Overview of attention for article published in Virus Evolution, December 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Geography and host species shape the evolutionary dynamics of U genogroup infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus
Published in
Virus Evolution, December 2016
DOI 10.1093/ve/vew034
Pubmed ID
Authors

Allison Black, Rachel Breyta, Trevor Bedford, Gael Kurath

Abstract

Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a negative-sense RNA virus that infects wild and cultured salmonids throughout the Pacific Coastal United States and Canada, from California to Alaska. Although infection of adult fish is usually asymptomatic, juvenile infections can result in high mortality events that impact salmon hatchery programs and commercial aquaculture. We used epidemiological case data and genetic sequence data from a 303 nt portion of the viral glycoprotein gene to study the evolutionary dynamics of U genogroup IHNV in the Pacific Northwestern United States from 1971 to 2013. We identified 114 unique genotypes among 1,219 U genogroup IHNV isolates representing 619 virus detection events. We found evidence for two previously unidentified, broad subgroups within the U genogroup, which we designated 'UC' and 'UP'. Epidemiologic records indicated that UP viruses were detected more frequently in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and in coastal waters of Washington and Oregon, whereas UC viruses were detected primarily in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Columbia River Basin, which is a large, complex watershed extending throughout much of interior Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. These findings were supported by phylogenetic analysis and byFST. Ancestral state reconstruction indicated that early UC viruses in the Columbia River Basin initially infected sockeye salmon but then emerged via host shifts into Chinook salmon and steelhead trout sometime during the 1980s. We postulate that the development of these subgroups within U genogroup was driven by selection pressure for viral adaptation to Chinook salmon and steelhead trout within the Columbia River Basin.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 43%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 29%
Other 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 43%
Unspecified 3 21%
Environmental Science 2 14%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2017.
All research outputs
#3,747,885
of 8,862,686 outputs
Outputs from Virus Evolution
#70
of 116 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,878
of 302,833 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virus Evolution
#15
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,862,686 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 116 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,833 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.