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Early invasive versus conservative strategies for unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction in the stent era

Overview of attention for article published in this source, March 2010
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Mentioned by

blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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69 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
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Title
Early invasive versus conservative strategies for unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction in the stent era
Published by
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, March 2010
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd004815.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hoenig, Michel R, Aroney, Constantine N, Scott, Ian A

Abstract

In patients with unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI) two strategies are possible, either a routine invasive strategy where all patients undergo coronary angiography shortly after admission and, if indicated, coronary revascularization; or a conservative strategy where medical therapy alone is used initially, with selection of patients for angiography based on clinical symptoms or investigational evidence of persistent myocardial ischemia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 4%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 21 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 22%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 17%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Other 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 91%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%