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Living and dying: responsibility for end-of-life care in care homes without on-site nursing provision - a prospective study

Overview of attention for article published in Health & Social Care in the Community, May 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
101 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Living and dying: responsibility for end-of-life care in care homes without on-site nursing provision - a prospective study
Published in
Health & Social Care in the Community, May 2013
DOI 10.1111/hsc.12055
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melanie Handley, Claire Goodman, Katherine Froggatt, Elspeth Mathie, Heather Gage, Jill Manthorpe, Stephen Barclay, Clare Crang, Steve Iliffe

Abstract

The aim of the study was to describe the expectations and experiences of end-of-life care of older people resident in care homes, and how care home staff and the healthcare practitioners who visited the care home interpreted their role. A mixed-method design was used. The everyday experience of 121 residents from six care homes in the East of England were tracked; 63 residents, 30 care home staff with assorted roles and 19 National Health Service staff from different disciplines were interviewed. The review of care home notes demonstrated that residents had a wide range of healthcare problems. Length of time in the care homes, functional ability or episodes of ill-health were not necessarily meaningful indicators to staff that a resident was about to die. General Practitioner and district nursing services provided a frequent but episodic service to individual residents. There were two recurring themes that affected how staff engaged with the process of advance care planning with residents; 'talking about dying' and 'integrating living and dying'. All participants stated that they were committed to providing end-of-life care and supporting residents to die in the care home, if wanted. However, the process was complicated by an ongoing lack of clarity about roles and responsibilities in providing end-of-life care, doubts from care home and primary healthcare staff about their capacity to work together when residents' trajectories to death were unclear. The findings suggest that to support this population, there is a need for a pattern of working between health and care staff that can encourage review and discussion between multiple participants over sustained periods of time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 96 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 21%
Researcher 15 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Other 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 22 22%
Unknown 14 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 31 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 28%
Social Sciences 12 12%
Psychology 6 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 2%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 18 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2018.
All research outputs
#2,503,428
of 16,429,373 outputs
Outputs from Health & Social Care in the Community
#246
of 1,358 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,335
of 159,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health & Social Care in the Community
#7
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,429,373 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,358 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 159,534 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.