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Global phylogeographic limits of Hawaii's avian malaria

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, August 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
167 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
241 Mendeley
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Title
Global phylogeographic limits of Hawaii's avian malaria
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, August 2006
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2006.3671
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jon S Beadell, Farah Ishtiaq, Rita Covas, Martim Melo, Ben H Warren, Carter T Atkinson, Staffan Bensch, Gary R Graves, Yadvendradev V Jhala, Mike A Peirce, Asad R Rahmani, Dina M Fonseca, Robert C Fleischer

Abstract

The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) to Hawaii has provided a model system for studying the influence of exotic disease on naive host populations. Little is known, however, about the origin or the genetic variation of Hawaii's malaria and traditional classification methods have confounded attempts to place the parasite within a global ecological and evolutionary context. Using fragments of the parasite mitochondrial gene cytochrome b and the nuclear gene dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase obtained from a global survey of greater than 13000 avian samples, we show that Hawaii's avian malaria, which can cause high mortality and is a major limiting factor for many species of native passerines, represents just one of the numerous lineages composing the morphological parasite species. The single parasite lineage detected in Hawaii exhibits a broad host distribution worldwide and is dominant on several other remote oceanic islands, including Bermuda and Moorea, French Polynesia. The rarity of this lineage in the continental New World and the restriction of closely related lineages to the Old World suggest limitations to the transmission of reproductively isolated parasite groups within the morphological species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 241 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
Portugal 3 1%
Lithuania 2 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 217 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 60 25%
Researcher 46 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 18%
Student > Bachelor 25 10%
Student > Postgraduate 12 5%
Other 54 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 161 67%
Environmental Science 20 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 16 7%
Unspecified 16 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 5%
Other 16 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2016.
All research outputs
#1,144,819
of 12,363,710 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#2,956
of 7,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,327
of 148,337 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#14
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,363,710 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,248 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 148,337 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.