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Rapid in vivo lipid/carbohydrate quantification of single microalgal cell by Raman spectral imaging to reveal salinity-induced starch-to-lipid shift

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, January 2017
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Title
Rapid in vivo lipid/carbohydrate quantification of single microalgal cell by Raman spectral imaging to reveal salinity-induced starch-to-lipid shift
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13068-016-0691-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liang-da Chiu, Shih-Hsin Ho, Rintaro Shimada, Nan-Qi Ren, Takeaki Ozawa

Abstract

Lipid/carbohydrate content and ratio are extremely important when engineering algal cells for liquid biofuel production. However, conventional methods for such determination and quantification are not only destructive and tedious, but also energy consuming and environment unfriendly. In this study, we first demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy is a clean, fast, and accurate method to simultaneously quantify the lipid/carbohydrate content and ratio in living microalgal cells. The quantification results of both lipids and carbohydrates obtained by Raman spectroscopy showed a linear correspondence with that obtained by conventional methods, indicating Raman can provide a similar accuracy to conventional methods, with a significantly shorter detection time. Furthermore, the subcellular resolution of Raman spectroscopy enabled not only the concentration mapping of lipid/carbohydrate content in single living cells, but also the evaluation of standard deviation between the biomass accumulation levels of individual algal cells. In this study, we first demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy can be used for starch quantification in addition to lipid quantification in algal cells. Due to the easiness and non-destructive nature of Raman spectroscopy, it makes a perfect tool for the further study of starch-lipid shift mechanism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 29%
Researcher 9 20%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 4%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Chemistry 5 11%
Physics and Astronomy 4 9%
Chemical Engineering 3 7%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2017.
All research outputs
#4,794,284
of 8,854,945 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#371
of 733 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,697
of 301,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#24
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,854,945 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 733 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,902 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.