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Living near major roads and the incidence of dementia, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis: a population-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in The Lancet, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 31,027)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
281 news outlets
blogs
30 blogs
twitter
773 tweeters
facebook
56 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
139 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
287 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Living near major roads and the incidence of dementia, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis: a population-based cohort study
Published in
The Lancet, February 2017
DOI 10.1016/s0140-6736(16)32399-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hong Chen, Jeffrey C Kwong, Ray Copes, Karen Tu, Paul J Villeneuve, Aaron van Donkelaar, Perry Hystad, Randall V Martin, Brian J Murray, Barry Jessiman, Andrew S Wilton, Alexander Kopp, Richard T Burnett

Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests that living near major roads might adversely affect cognition. However, little is known about its relationship with the incidence of dementia, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. We aimed to investigate the association between residential proximity to major roadways and the incidence of these three neurological diseases in Ontario, Canada. In this population-based cohort study, we assembled two population-based cohorts including all adults aged 20-50 years (about 4·4 million; multiple sclerosis cohort) and all adults aged 55-85 years (about 2·2 million; dementia or Parkinson's disease cohort) who resided in Ontario, Canada on April 1, 2001. Eligible patients were free of these neurological diseases, Ontario residents for 5 years or longer, and Canadian-born. We ascertained the individual's proximity to major roadways based on their residential postal-code address in 1996, 5 years before cohort inception. Incident diagnoses of dementia, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis were ascertained from provincial health administrative databases with validated algorithms. We assessed the associations between traffic proximity and incident dementia, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for individual and contextual factors such as diabetes, brain injury, and neighbourhood income. We did various sensitivity analyses, such as adjusting for access to neurologists and exposure to selected air pollutants, and restricting to never movers and urban dwellers. Between 2001, and 2012, we identified 243 611 incident cases of dementia, 31 577 cases of Parkinson's disease, and 9247 cases of multiple sclerosis. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of incident dementia was 1·07 for people living less than 50 m from a major traffic road (95% CI 1·06-1·08), 1·04 (1·02-1·05) for 50-100 m, 1·02 (1·01-1·03) for 101-200 m, and 1·00 (0·99-1·01) for 201-300 m versus further than 300 m (p for trend=0·0349). The associations were robust to sensitivity analyses and seemed stronger among urban residents, especially those who lived in major cities (HR 1·12, 95% CI 1·10-1·14 for people living <50 m from a major traffic road), and who never moved (1·12, 1·10-1·14 for people living <50 m from a major traffic road). No association was found with Parkinson's disease or multiple sclerosis. In this large population-based cohort, living close to heavy traffic was associated with a higher incidence of dementia, but not with Parkinson's disease or multiple sclerosis. Health Canada (MOA-4500314182).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 773 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 287 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 286 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 1%
Researcher 3 1%
Student > Master 2 <1%
Student > Bachelor 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 274 95%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 3 1%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 1%
Unspecified 2 <1%
Decision Sciences 1 <1%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 274 95%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3025. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2019.
All research outputs
#218
of 12,819,611 outputs
Outputs from The Lancet
#18
of 31,027 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12
of 368,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Lancet
#2
of 451 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,819,611 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 31,027 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 368,066 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 451 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.