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Early administration of inhaled corticosteroids for preventing chronic lung disease in very low birth weight preterm neonates

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, January 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

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183 Mendeley
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Title
Early administration of inhaled corticosteroids for preventing chronic lung disease in very low birth weight preterm neonates
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, January 2017
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd001969.pub4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vibhuti S Shah, Arne Ohlsson, Henry L Halliday, Michael Dunn

Abstract

Chronic lung disease (CLD) remains a common complication among preterm infants. There is increasing evidence that inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CLD. Due to their strong anti-inflammatory properties, corticosteroids are an attractive intervention strategy. However, there are growing concerns regarding short- and long-term effects of systemic corticosteroids. Theoretically, administration of inhaled corticosteroids may allow for beneficial effects on the pulmonary system with a lower risk of undesirable systemic side effects. To determine the impact of inhaled corticosteroids administered to preterm infants with birth weight up to 1500 grams (VLBW) beginning in the first two weeks after birth for the prevention of CLD as reflected by the requirement for supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA). Randomised and quasi-randomised trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 12) in the Cochrane Library (searched 5 January 2016), MEDLINE (1966 to 5 January 2016), Embase (1980 to 5 January 2016), CINAHL (1982 to 5 January 2016), reference lists of published trials and abstracts published in Pediatric Research or electronically on the Pediatric Academic Societies web-site (1990 to May 2016). We included in this review randomised controlled trials of inhaled corticosteroid therapy initiated within the first two weeks of life in VLBW preterm infants. We evaluated data regarding clinical outcomes, including: CLD at 28 days or 36 weeks' PMA; mortality; combined outcome of death or CLD at 28 days of age and at 36 weeks' PMA; the need for systemic corticosteroids; failure to extubate within 14 days; and adverse effects of corticosteroids. All data were analysed using Review Manager (RevMan) 5. Meta-analyses were performed using relative risk (RR) and risk difference (RD), along with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). If RD was significant, the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) was calculated. We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. According to GRADE the quality of the studies was moderate. Three additional trials are included in this update. The present review includes data analyses based on 10 qualifying trials that enrolled 1644 neonates. There was no significant difference in the incidence of CLD at 36 weeks' PMA in the inhaled steroid versus the placebo group (5 trials, 429 neonates) among all randomised (typical RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.52; typical RD -0.00, 95% CI -0.07 to 0.06). There was no heterogeneity for this outcome (typical RR I² = 11%; typical RD I² = 0%). There was a significant reduction in the incidence of CLD at 36 weeks' PMA among survivors (6 trials, 1088 neonates) (typical RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.93; typical RD -0.07, 95% CI -0.13 to -0.02; NNTB 14, 95% CI 8 to 50). There was a significant reduction in the combined outcome of death or CLD at 36 weeks' PMA among all randomised neonates (6 trials, 1285 neonates) (typical RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.99; typical RD -0.06, 95% CI -0.11 to -0.00) (P = 0.04); NNTB 17, 95% CI 9 to infinity). There was no significant heterogeneity for any of these analyses (I² = 0%). A lower rate of reintubation was noted in the inhaled steroid group compared with the control group in one study. There were no statistically significant differences in short-term complications between groups and no differences in adverse events at long-term follow-up reported. Long-term follow-up of infants enrolled in the study by Bassler 2015 is ongoing. Based on this updated review, there is increasing evidence from the trials reviewed that early administration of inhaled steroids to VLBW neonates is effective in reducing the incidence of death or CLD at 36 weeks' PMA among either all randomised infants or among survivors. Even though there is statistical significance, the clinical relevance is of question as the upper CI limit for the outcome of death or CLD at 36 weeks' PMA is infinity. The long-term follow-up results of the Bassler 2015 study may affect the conclusions of this review. Further studies are needed to identify the risk/benefit ratio of different delivery techniques and dosing schedules for the administration of these medications. Studies need to address both the short- and long-term benefits and adverse effects of inhaled steroids with particular attention to neurodevelopmental outcome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 183 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 1%
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 179 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 31 17%
Student > Master 31 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 15%
Other 20 11%
Researcher 15 8%
Other 58 32%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 95 52%
Unspecified 38 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 7%
Psychology 10 5%
Social Sciences 8 4%
Other 19 10%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2018.
All research outputs
#836,120
of 12,527,219 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#2,698
of 8,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,328
of 363,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#54
of 163 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,527,219 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,923 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,529 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 163 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.