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Cuff Pressure Pain Detection Is Associated with Both Sex and Physical Activity Level in Nonathletic Healthy Subjects

Overview of attention for article published in Pain Medicine, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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30 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Cuff Pressure Pain Detection Is Associated with Both Sex and Physical Activity Level in Nonathletic Healthy Subjects
Published in
Pain Medicine, January 2017
DOI 10.1093/pm/pnw309
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dag Lemming, Björn Börsbo, Anna Sjörs, Eva-Britt Lind, Lars Arendt-Nielsen, Thomas Graven-Nielsen, Björn Gerdle

Abstract

PURPOSE : The aim of this study was to evaluate pressure pain sensitivity on leg and arm in 98 healthy persons (50 women) using cuff algometry. Furthermore, associations with sex and physical activity level were investigated.  Normal physical activity level was defined as Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) score ≤ 45 and high activity level as GLTEQ > 45. A pneumatic double-chamber cuff was placed around the arm or leg where a single chamber was inflated. The cuff inflation rate (1 kPa/s) was constant, and pain intensity was registered continuously on a 10 cm electronic visual analogue scale (VAS). The pain detection threshold (PDT) was defined as when the pressure was perceived as painful, and pain tolerance (PTT) was when the subject terminated the cuff inflation. For PTT, the corresponding VAS score was recorded (VAS-PTT). The protocol was repeated with two chambers inflated. RESULT : Only single cuff results are given. For women compared with men, the PDT was lower when assessed in the arm (P = 0.002), PTTs were lower in the arm and leg (P < 0.001), and the VAS-PTT was higher in the arm and leg (P < 0.033). Highly active participants compared with less active had higher PDT (P = 0.027) in the leg. Women showed facilitated spatial summation (P < 0.014) in the arm and leg and a steeper VAS slope (i.e., the slope of the VAS pressure curve between PDT and PPT) in the arm and leg (P < 0.003).  This study indicates that reduced pressure pain sensitivity is associated both with male sex and physical activity level.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 29%
Researcher 3 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Professor 2 14%
Other 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 14%
Unspecified 2 14%
Neuroscience 2 14%
Psychology 1 7%
Other 3 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2017.
All research outputs
#650,086
of 12,031,941 outputs
Outputs from Pain Medicine
#142
of 1,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,212
of 325,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pain Medicine
#4
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,031,941 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,650 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 325,857 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.