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Extensor Pollicis Brevis tendon damage presenting as de Quervain’s disease following kettlebell training

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 171)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters
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4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Extensor Pollicis Brevis tendon damage presenting as de Quervain’s disease following kettlebell training
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/2052-1847-5-13
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karuppaiah Karthik, Charles William Carter-Esdale, Sanjay Vijayanathan, Tony Kochhar

Abstract

Kettlebell exercises are more efficient for an athlete to increase his or her muscle strength. However it carries the risk of injury especially in the beginners. A 39 year old gentleman came to our clinic with radial sided wrist pain following kettlebell exercises. Clinically patient had swelling and tenderness over the tendons in the first dorsal wrist compartment, besides Finklesten test was positive. Patient had a decreased excursion of the thumb when compared to the opposite side. Ultrasound/MRI scan revealed asymmetric thickening of the 1st compartment extensors extending from the base of the thumb to the wrist joint. Besides injury to the Extensor Pollicis Brevis (EPB) tendon by repetitive impact from kettlebell, leading to its split was identified. Detailed history showed that the injury might be due to off-centre handle holding during triceps strengthening exercises. Our report stresses the fact that kettlebell users should be taught about problems of off-center handle holding to avoid wrist injuries. Also, in Kettlebell users with De Quervains disease clinical and radiological evaluation should be done before steroid injection as this might lead to complete tendon rupture.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Master 4 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 7 22%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 11 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,055,284
of 11,727,438 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#47
of 171 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,881
of 136,680 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,727,438 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 171 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 136,680 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them