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Effects of Sex Pheromones and Sexual Maturation on Locomotor Activity in Female Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biological Rhythms, January 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of Sex Pheromones and Sexual Maturation on Locomotor Activity in Female Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)
Published in
Journal of Biological Rhythms, January 2013
DOI 10.1177/0748730413488994
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erin J. Walaszczyk, Nicholas S. Johnson, Juan Pedro Steibel, Weiming Li, Walaszczyk EJ, Johnson NS, Steibel JP, Li W

Abstract

Synchronization of male and female locomotor rhythmicity can play a vital role in ensuring reproductive success. Several physiological and environmental factors alter these locomotor rhythms. As sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, progress through their life cycle, their locomotor activity rhythm changes multiple times. The goal of this study was to elucidate the activity patterns of adult female sea lamprey during the sexual maturation process and discern the interactions of these patterns with exposure to male pheromones. During these stages, preovulated and ovulated adult females are exposed to sex pheromone compounds, which are released by spermiated males and attract ovulated females to the nest for spawning. The locomotor behavior of adult females was monitored in a natural stream with a passive integrated tag responder system as they matured, and they were exposed to a sex pheromone treatment (spermiated male washings) or a control (prespermiated male washings). Results showed that, dependent on the hour of day, male sex pheromone compounds reduce total activity (p < 0.05) and cause increases in activity during several daytime hours in preovulated and ovulated females. These results are one of the first examples of how sex pheromones modulate a locomotor rhythm in a vertebrate, and they suggest that the interaction between maturity stage and sex pheromone exposure contributes to the differential locomotor rhythms found in adult female sea lamprey. This phenomenon may contribute to the reproductive synchrony of mature adults, thus increasing reproductive success in this species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 38%
Researcher 3 38%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 75%
Unspecified 1 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2013.
All research outputs
#6,123,022
of 11,204,402 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biological Rhythms
#235
of 399 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,867
of 132,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biological Rhythms
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,204,402 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 399 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 132,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them