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Reproductive phenology of the American Bullfrog in subtropical Brazil: photoperiod as a main determinant of seasonal activity

Overview of attention for article published in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, July 2016
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Title
Reproductive phenology of the American Bullfrog in subtropical Brazil: photoperiod as a main determinant of seasonal activity
Published in
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, July 2016
DOI 10.1590/0001-3765201620150694
Pubmed ID
Authors

CAMILA I. MEDEIROS, CAMILA BOTH, IGOR L. KAEFER, SONIA Z. CECHIN

Abstract

The North American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus continues to invade ecosystems worldwide, potentially causing population declines and even extinctions. Within its native distribution, bullfrogs show prolonged reproductive seasons and high fertility. However, data on breeding biology of bullfrogs ex-situ in invaded localities mainly comes from anecdotal reports. Understanding how invasive species are adjusting their life histories to new colonized environments is important for conservation purposes. Here we describe temporal and spatial abundance, calling activity, spawning and tadpole distribution of bullfrogs in southern Brazil. Eighteen samplings occurred during one year. The abundance of individuals was positively related to longer photoperiods and higher temperatures. Reproductive activity was also positively associated with longer photoperiods. Calling sites, spawning and tadpoles were associated with microhabitats presenting hydrophytes, which may provide shelter and thermal stability to bullfrogs. The reproductive seasonal activity of bullfrogs can be highly variable across its growing geographical range, but in subtropical Brazil it is associated with photoperiod, a highly predictable abiotic determinant. In our study area, bullfrogs presented a breeding season twice as long as that observed in some native localities. We suggest that management strategies directed to bullfrog populations must consider the habitat structures and seasonal regimes determined by each invaded environment.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 32%
Student > Master 5 18%
Researcher 4 14%
Professor 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 54%
Environmental Science 4 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Computer Science 1 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 14%