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Genome-wide association study identifies distinct genetic contributions to prognosis and susceptibility in Crohn's disease

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Genetics, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
twitter
63 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
215 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Genome-wide association study identifies distinct genetic contributions to prognosis and susceptibility in Crohn's disease
Published in
Nature Genetics, January 2017
DOI 10.1038/ng.3755
Pubmed ID
Authors

James C Lee, Daniele Biasci, Rebecca Roberts, Richard B Gearry, John C Mansfield, Tariq Ahmad, Natalie J Prescott, Jack Satsangi, David C Wilson, Luke Jostins, Carl A Anderson, James A Traherne, Paul A Lyons, Miles Parkes, Kenneth G C Smith

Abstract

For most immune-mediated diseases, the main determinant of patient well-being is not the diagnosis itself but instead the course that the disease takes over time (prognosis). Prognosis may vary substantially between patients for reasons that are poorly understood. Familial studies support a genetic contribution to prognosis, but little evidence has been found for a proposed association between prognosis and the burden of susceptibility variants. To better characterize how genetic variation influences disease prognosis, we performed a within-cases genome-wide association study in two cohorts of patients with Crohn's disease. We identified four genome-wide significant loci, none of which showed any association with disease susceptibility. Conversely, the aggregated effect of all 170 disease susceptibility loci was not associated with disease prognosis. Together, these data suggest that the genetic contribution to prognosis in Crohn's disease is largely independent of the contribution to disease susceptibility and point to a biology of prognosis that could provide new therapeutic opportunities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 63 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 215 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Qatar 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 206 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 53 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 22%
Unspecified 23 11%
Student > Master 20 9%
Student > Bachelor 18 8%
Other 53 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 59 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 52 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 17%
Unspecified 35 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 16 7%
Other 17 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 149. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2019.
All research outputs
#98,140
of 13,571,692 outputs
Outputs from Nature Genetics
#285
of 6,214 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,062
of 373,727 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Genetics
#15
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,571,692 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,214 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,727 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.