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Hebbian and Anti-Hebbian Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity of Human Cortico-Cortical Connections

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroscience, June 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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79 Dimensions

Readers on

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193 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Hebbian and Anti-Hebbian Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity of Human Cortico-Cortical Connections
Published in
Journal of Neuroscience, June 2013
DOI 10.1523/jneurosci.4988-12.2013
Pubmed ID
Authors

G. Koch, V. Ponzo, F. Di Lorenzo, C. Caltagirone, D. Veniero

Abstract

Learning of new skills may occur through Hebbian associative changes in the synaptic strength of cortical connections [spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP)], but how the precise temporal relationship of the presynaptic and postsynaptic inputs determines the STDP effects in humans is poorly understood. We used a novel paired associative stimulation protocol to repeatedly activate the short-latency connection between the posterior parietal cortex and the primary motor cortex (M1) of the left-dominant hemisphere. In different experiments, we systematically varied the temporal relationships between the stimuli and the preferential activation of different M1 neuronal populations by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation over M1 with different coil orientations and in different states of cortical excitability (rest vs muscular contraction). We found evidence for the existence of both Hebbian and anti-Hebbian STDP in human long-range connections. The induction of bidirectional long-term potentiation or depression in M1 depended not only on the relative timing between the stimuli but, crucially, on the stimulation of specific neuronal populations and the activity state of the cortex. Our findings demonstrate that these mechanisms are not fixed but susceptible to rapid adaptations. This sudden transition from anti-Hebbian to Hebbian plasticity likely involves local dynamics of interaction with different populations of postsynaptic neurons.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 193 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Germany 3 2%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Japan 2 1%
Italy 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Serbia 1 <1%
Unknown 179 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 28%
Researcher 34 18%
Student > Master 31 16%
Student > Bachelor 21 11%
Other 9 5%
Other 25 13%
Unknown 19 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 61 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 16%
Psychology 23 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 11%
Computer Science 8 4%
Other 18 9%
Unknown 30 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2020.
All research outputs
#8,279,614
of 16,084,770 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroscience
#13,209
of 20,342 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,395
of 158,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroscience
#161
of 330 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,084,770 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 20,342 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,408 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 330 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.