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Bald Eagle Nestling Mortality Associated with Argas radiatus and Argas ricei Tick Infestation and Successful…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, October 2016
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Title
Bald Eagle Nestling Mortality Associated with Argas radiatus and Argas ricei Tick Infestation and Successful Management with Nest Removal in Arizona, USA
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, October 2016
DOI 10.7589/2015-10-271
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Justice-Allen, Kathy Orr, Krysten Schuler, Kyle McCarty, Kenneth Jacobson, Carol Meteyer

Abstract

Eight Bald Eagle ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) nestlings heavily infested with larval ticks were found in or under a nest near the confluence of the Verde and Salt Rivers in Arizona in 2009-2011. The 8-12-wk-old nestlings were slow to respond to stimuli and exhibited generalized muscle weakness or paresis of the pelvic limbs. Numerous cutaneous and subcutaneous hemorrhages were associated with sites of tick attachment. Ticks were identified as Argas radiatus and Argas ricei. Treatment with acaricides and infection with West Nile virus (WNV) may have confounded the clinical presentation in 2009 and 2010. However, WNV-negative birds exhibited similar signs in 2011. One nestling recovered from paresis within 36 h after the removal of all adult and larval ticks (>350) and was released within 3 wk. The signs present in the heavily infested Bald Eagle nestlings resembled signs associated with tick paralysis, a neurotoxin-mediated paralytic syndrome described in mammals, reptiles, and wild birds (though not eagles). Removal of the infested nest and construction of a nest platform in a different tree was necessary to break the cycle of infection. The original nesting pair constructed a new nest on the man-made platform and successfully fledged two Bald Eagles in 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 23%
Researcher 3 23%
Student > Master 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 15%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 15%
Chemistry 1 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2018.
All research outputs
#11,186,400
of 12,571,426 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#534
of 534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#301,094
of 365,749 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,571,426 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 534 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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