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Trends in Methyltert-Butyl Ether Concentrations in Private Wells in Southeast New Hampshire: 2005 to 2015

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, January 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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1 Facebook page

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4 Mendeley
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Title
Trends in Methyltert-Butyl Ether Concentrations in Private Wells in Southeast New Hampshire: 2005 to 2015
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, January 2017
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.6b04149
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah M. Flanagan, Joseph P. Levitt, Joseph D. Ayotte

Abstract

In southeast New Hampshire, where reformulated gasoline was used from the 1990s to 2007, methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) concentrations ≥0.2 μg/L were found in water from 26.7% of 195 domestic wells sampled in 2005. Ten years later in 2015, and eight years after MtBE was banned, 10.3% continue to have MtBE. Most wells (140 of 195) had no MtBE detections (concentrations <0.2 μg/L) in 2005 and 2015. Of the remaining wells, MtBE concentrations increased in 4 wells, decreased in 47 wells, and did not change in 4 wells. On average, MtBE concentrations decreased 65% among 47 wells whereas MtBE concentrations increased 17% among 4 wells between 2005 and 2015. The percent change in detection frequency from 2005 to 2015 (the decontamination rate) was lowest (45.5%) in high-population-density areas and in wells completed in the Berwick Formation geologic units. The decontamination rate was the highest (78.6%) where population densities were low and wells were completed in bedrock composed of granite, metamorphic, and mafic rocks. Wells in the Berwick Formation are characteristically deeper and have lower yields than wells in other rock types and have shallower overburden cover, which may allow for more rapid transport of MtBE from land-surface releases. Low-yielding, deep bedrock wells may require large contributing areas to achieve adequate well yield, and thus have a greater chance of intercepting MtBE, in addition to diluting contaminants at a slower rate and thus requiring more time to decontaminate.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 50%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 25%
Other 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 3 75%
Unspecified 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2017.
All research outputs
#3,884,761
of 8,900,478 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#6,743
of 9,826 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,200
of 302,379 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#115
of 192 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,900,478 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,826 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,379 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 192 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.