↓ Skip to main content

Demographic response of snake-necked turtles correlates with indigenous harvest and feral pig predation in tropical northern Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, November 2007
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Demographic response of snake-necked turtles correlates with indigenous harvest and feral pig predation in tropical northern Australia
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, November 2007
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2007.01298.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

DAMIEN A. FORDHAM, ARTHUR GEORGES, BARRY W. BROOK

Abstract

Species that mature late, experience high levels of survival and have long generation times are more vulnerable to chronic increases in mortality than species with higher fecundity and more rapid turnover of generations. Many chelonians have low hatchling survival, slow growth, delayed sexual maturity and high subadult and adult survival. This constrains their ability to respond quickly to increases in adult mortality from harvesting or habitat alteration. In contrast, the northern snake-necked turtle Chelodina rugosa (Ogilby 1890) is fast-growing, early maturing and highly fecund relative to other turtles, and may be resilient to increased mortality. Here we provide correlative evidence spanning six study sites and three field seasons, indicating that C. rugosa is able to compensate demographically to conditions of relatively low subadult and adult survival, caused by pig Sus scrofa (Linnaeus 1758) predation and customary harvesting by humans. Recruitment and age specific fecundity tended to be greater in sites with low adult and subadult survival (and thus reduced densities of large turtles), owing to higher juvenile survival, a smaller size at onset of maturity and faster post-maturity growth. These patterns are consistent with compensatory density-dependent responses, and as such challenge the generality that high subadult and adult survival is crucial for achieving long-term population stability in long-lived vertebrates such as chelonians. We posit that long-lived species with 'fast' recruitment and a capacity for a compensatory demographic response, similar to C. rugosa, may be able to persist in the face of occasional or sustained adult harvest without inevitably threatening population viability.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 5%
United States 3 4%
Australia 1 1%
Philippines 1 1%
India 1 1%
Unknown 68 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 17%
Student > Master 8 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 7 9%
Other 17 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 54 69%
Environmental Science 14 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Unspecified 3 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2010.
All research outputs
#3,549,955
of 12,353,464 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#991
of 1,776 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,646
of 338,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#32
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,464 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,776 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,276 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.