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Life history plasticity does not confer resilience to environmental change in the mole salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum)

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, January 2017
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7 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Life history plasticity does not confer resilience to environmental change in the mole salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum)
Published in
Oecologia, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00442-017-3810-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Courtney L. Davis, David A.W. Miller, Susan C. Walls, William J. Barichivich, Jeffrey Riley, Mary E. Brown

Abstract

Plasticity in life history strategies can be advantageous for species that occupy spatially or temporally variable environments. We examined how phenotypic plasticity influences responses of the mole salamander, Ambystoma talpoideum, to disturbance events at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (SMNWR), FL, USA from 2009 to 2014. We observed periods of extensive drought early in the study, in contrast to high rainfall and expansive flooding events in later years. Flooding facilitated colonization of predatory fishes to isolated wetlands across the refuge. We employed multistate occupancy models to determine how this natural experiment influenced the occurrence of aquatic larvae and paedomorphic adults and what implications this may have for the population. We found that, in terms of occurrence, responses to environmental variation differed between larvae and paedomorphs, but plasticity (i.e. the ability to metamorphose rather than remain in aquatic environment) was not sufficient to buffer populations from declining as a result of environmental perturbations. Drought and fish presence negatively influenced occurrence dynamics of larval and paedomorphic mole salamanders and, consequently, contributed to observed short-term declines of this species. Overall occurrence of larval salamanders decreased from 0.611 in 2009 to 0.075 in 2014 and paedomorph occurrence decreased from 0.311 in 2009 to 0.121 in 2014. Although variation in selection pressures has likely maintained this polyphenism previously, our results suggest that continued changes in environmental variability and the persistence of fish in isolated wetlands could lead to a loss of paedomorphosis in the SMNWR population and, ultimately, impact regional persistence in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 31%
Student > Master 6 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 56%
Environmental Science 8 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2017.
All research outputs
#5,696,145
of 18,812,015 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#1,451
of 4,171 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,718
of 402,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#32
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,812,015 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,171 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 402,611 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.