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Hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation effects after increased in positive end-expiratory pressure in coronary artery bypass surgery

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Physiotherapy, January 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

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3 Mendeley
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Title
Hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation effects after increased in positive end-expiratory pressure in coronary artery bypass surgery
Published in
Archives of Physiotherapy, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40945-016-0030-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vanessa Marques Ferreira Méndez, Mayron F. Oliveira, Adriana do Nascimento Baião, Patrícia Andrade Xavier, Carlos Gun, Priscila A. Sperandio, Iracema I. K. Umeda

Abstract

Cardiac surgery is widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, several complications can be observed during the postoperative period. Positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves gas exchange, but it might be related to decreased cardiac output and possible impairment of tissue oxygenation. The aim of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic effects and oxygen saturation of central venous blood (ScvO2) after increasing PEEP in hypoxemic patients after coronary artery bypass (CAB) surgery. Seventy post-cardiac surgery patients (CAB), 61 ± 7 years, without ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction 57 ± 2%), with hypoxemia (PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200) were enrolled. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, arterial and venous blood samples were measured at intensive care unit and PEEP was increased to 12 cmH2O for 30 min. As expected, PEEP12 improved arterial oxygenation and PaO2/FiO2 ratio (p < 0.0001). Reduction in ScvO2 was observed between PEEP5 (63 ± 2%) and PEEP12 (57 ± 1%; p = 0.01) with higher values of blood lactate in PEEP12 (p < 0.01). No hemodynamic effects (heart rate, mean arterial pressure, SpO2; p > 0.05) were related. Increased PEEP after cardiac surgery decreased ScvO2 and increased blood lactate, even with higher O2 delivery. PEEP did not interfere in hemodynamics status in CAB patients, suggesting that peripheral parameters must be controlled and measured during procedures involving increased PEEP in post-cardiac surgery patients in the intensive care unit.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 33%
Student > Master 1 33%
Unknown 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Philosophy 1 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 33%
Unknown 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2017.
All research outputs
#6,525,626
of 12,088,915 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Physiotherapy
#22
of 40 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,533
of 355,203 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Physiotherapy
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,088,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 40 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one scored the same or higher as 18 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,203 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.