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NADPH oxidase in brain injury and neurodegenerative disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Neurodegeneration, January 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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131 Dimensions

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162 Mendeley
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Title
NADPH oxidase in brain injury and neurodegenerative disorders
Published in
Molecular Neurodegeneration, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13024-017-0150-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Merry W. Ma, Jing Wang, Quanguang Zhang, Ruimin Wang, Krishnan M. Dhandapani, Ratna K. Vadlamudi, Darrell W. Brann

Abstract

Oxidative stress is a common denominator in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis, as well as in ischemic and traumatic brain injury. The brain is highly vulnerable to oxidative damage due to its high metabolic demand. However, therapies attempting to scavenge free radicals have shown little success. By shifting the focus to inhibit the generation of damaging free radicals, recent studies have identified NADPH oxidase as a major contributor to disease pathology. NADPH oxidase has the primary function to generate free radicals. In particular, there is growing evidence that the isoforms NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4 can be upregulated by a variety of neurodegenerative factors. The majority of recent studies have shown that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase enzymes are neuroprotective and able to reduce detrimental aspects of pathology following ischemic and traumatic brain injury, as well as in chronic neurodegenerative disorders. This review aims to summarize evidence supporting the role of NADPH oxidase in the pathology of these neurological disorders, explores pharmacological strategies of targeting this major oxidative stress pathway, and outlines obstacles that need to be overcome for successful translation of these therapies to the clinic.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Austria 1 <1%
Unknown 161 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 23%
Student > Master 25 15%
Researcher 20 12%
Student > Bachelor 19 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 8%
Other 27 17%
Unknown 20 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 34 21%
Neuroscience 28 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 13 8%
Other 26 16%
Unknown 23 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2019.
All research outputs
#9,260,784
of 15,780,384 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#474
of 638 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,910
of 355,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,780,384 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 638 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,602 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.