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Physical integrity and residual bio-efficacy of used LLINs in three cities of the South-West region of Cameroon 4 years after the first national mass-distribution campaign

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2017
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Title
Physical integrity and residual bio-efficacy of used LLINs in three cities of the South-West region of Cameroon 4 years after the first national mass-distribution campaign
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1690-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stravensky T. Boussougou-Sambe, Parfait Awono-Ambene, Geraud C. T. Tasse, Josiane Etang, Jerome A. Binyang, Lynda D. Nouage, Gaston Wamba, Peter Enyong, Eric B. Fokam

Abstract

Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) are effective tools at reducing malaria transmission. In Cameroon, following the first national mass distribution campaign in 2011, there has been no follow up on the efficacy of LLINs distributed. The aim of this report is to assess the physical integrity and insecticidal potency of LLINs distributed in three cities with contrasting socio economic status (SES) and to evaluate the use and care for bed nets owned by individuals. The study was conducted in Limbe, Tiko and Buea three localities in the Fako division of the South West Region of Cameroon. Tiko had the highest SES based on the type of building materials used, followed respectively by Limbe and Buea. The use and care for bed nets was assessed using a questionnaire, the physical state of bed nets evaluated following WHOPES recommendation for determining size of holes and the residual insecticidal activity of retrieved bed nets determined through a cone bioassay using susceptible strains of mosquitoes. Of the 241 households visited in Limbe (n = 81), Tiko (n = 80) and Buea (n = 80), 186 (77.2%) had LLINs, with no significant variations from the selected study locations. However, bed net coverage was not meeting World Health Organization standards (p < 0.0001). Six different brands of LLINs were recorded, and the majority were those provided by the NMCP through the 2011 national mass campaign or antenatal care programme. Based on the calculation of the Proportionate Hole Index (PHI) as indicator of physical integrity of nets, the proportion of nets classified as serviceable (versus too torn) differed statistically according to locations (p value = 0.04), with 63.8% in Tiko, 50% in Limbe and 47% in Buea. Of the 20 nets tested for their efficacy against susceptible strains of mosquito, 42.6% (3 nets) were optimally effective in Tiko, 57.4% (4), 16.7% (1) and 14.3% (1) were minimally effective in Tiko, Buea and Limbe respectively. Finally; 85.7% (6) and 83.3% (5) were not effective in Limbe and Buea. These findings pinpoint the need for more frequent replacement of LLINs especially for people with low SES and also the need for the promotion of good practices on the maintenance and washing of nets.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Chemistry 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 9 24%
Unknown 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2017.
All research outputs
#5,976,555
of 10,241,641 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,430
of 3,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,950
of 317,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#85
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,241,641 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,306 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,090 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.