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Mistreatment of women during childbirth in Abuja, Nigeria: a qualitative study on perceptions and experiences of women and healthcare providers

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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105 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
370 Mendeley
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Title
Mistreatment of women during childbirth in Abuja, Nigeria: a qualitative study on perceptions and experiences of women and healthcare providers
Published in
Reproductive Health, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12978-016-0265-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Meghan A. Bohren, Joshua P. Vogel, Özge Tunçalp, Bukola Fawole, Musibau A. Titiloye, Akinpelu Olanrewaju Olutayo, Modupe Ogunlade, Agnes A. Oyeniran, Olubunmi R. Osunsan, Loveth Metiboba, Hadiza A. Idris, Francis E. Alu, Olufemi T. Oladapo, A. Metin Gülmezoglu, Michelle J. Hindin

Abstract

Global efforts have increased facility-based childbirth, but substantial barriers remain in some settings. In Nigeria, women report that poor provider attitudes influence their use of maternal health services. Evidence also suggests that women in Nigeria may experience mistreatment during childbirth; however, there is limited understanding of how and why mistreatment this occurs. This study uses qualitative methods to explore women and providers' experiences and perceptions of mistreatment during childbirth in two health facilities and catchment areas in Abuja, Nigeria. In-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) were used with a purposive sample of women of reproductive age, midwives, doctors and facility administrators. Instruments were semi-structured discussion guides. Participants were asked about their experiences and perceptions of, and perceived factors influencing mistreatment during childbirth. Thematic analysis was used to synthesize findings into meaningful sub-themes, narrative text and illustrative quotations, which were interpreted within the context of this study and an existing typology of mistreatment during childbirth. Women and providers reported experiencing or witnessing physical abuse including slapping, physical restraint to a delivery bed, and detainment in the hospital and verbal abuse, such as shouting and threatening women with physical abuse. Women sometimes overcame tremendous barriers to reach a hospital, only to give birth on the floor, unattended by a provider. Participants identified three main factors contributing to mistreatment: poor provider attitudes, women's behavior, and health systems constraints. Moving forward, findings from this study must be communicated to key stakeholders at the study facilities. Measurement tools to assess how often mistreatment occurs and in what manner must be developed for monitoring and evaluation. Any intervention to prevent mistreatment will need to be multifaceted, and implementers should consider lessons learned from related interventions, such as increasing audit and feedback including from women, promoting labor companionship and encouraging stress-coping training for providers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 370 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 370 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 75 20%
Researcher 41 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 30 8%
Student > Bachelor 26 7%
Other 80 22%
Unknown 80 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 85 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 84 23%
Social Sciences 44 12%
Psychology 14 4%
Unspecified 10 3%
Other 37 10%
Unknown 96 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 December 2019.
All research outputs
#1,589,882
of 21,756,717 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#148
of 1,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,735
of 393,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,756,717 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 393,472 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them