↓ Skip to main content

Swimming in the deep end of the gene pool: global population structure of an oceanic giant

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, December 2007
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
111 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Swimming in the deep end of the gene pool: global population structure of an oceanic giant
Published in
Molecular Ecology, December 2007
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-294x.2007.03548.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

COREY J. A. BRADSHAW

Abstract

Despite the impression held by some that few biological mysteries remain, even evocative species such as humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) have poorly documented movement patterns, reproductive strategies and population dynamics despite years of dedicated research. This is largely due to the difficulty of observing wide-ranging marine species over the majority of their life cycle. The advent of powerful tracking devices has certainly improved our understanding, but it is usually only with molecular tools that the nature of population structure becomes apparent. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Castro and colleagues have provided the first global-scale assessment of population structure for the largest fish--whale sharks (Rhincodon typus). Whale sharks can reach lengths > 12 m and are a popular tourist attraction at places where they aggregate, yet for most of their life cycle, we know little indeed of where they go and how they interact with other populations. Previous tracking studies imply a high dispersal capacity, but only now have Castro and colleagues demonstrated high gene flow and haplotype diversity among the major ocean basins where they are found.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Australia 2 2%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Sri Lanka 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 97 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 26%
Student > Master 20 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 18%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Professor 8 7%
Other 21 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 81 73%
Environmental Science 15 14%
Unspecified 9 8%
Computer Science 2 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Other 2 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2013.
All research outputs
#1,337,109
of 12,354,212 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#976
of 4,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,202
of 334,037 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#38
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,212 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,162 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 334,037 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.