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Bioluminescence in the ghost fungus Omphalotus nidiformis does not attract potential spore dispersing insects

Overview of attention for article published in IMA Fungus, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 123)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Bioluminescence in the ghost fungus Omphalotus nidiformis does not attract potential spore dispersing insects
Published in
IMA Fungus, October 2016
DOI 10.5598/imafungus.2016.07.02.01
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip Weinstein, Steven Delean, Tom Wood, Andrew D. Austin

Abstract

Bioluminescence has been known from fungi since ancient times, but little work has been done to establish its potential role. There is evidence that some bioluminescent fungi differentially attract potential spore-dispersing insects, and we aimed to establish if this was the case for the ghost fungus, Omphalotus nidiformis (Agaricales,Marasmiaceae), a widespread Australian temperate zone species. We examined three corroborative lines of evidence: circadian rhythmicity of bioluminescence; field-recorded insect abundance at the time of basidiome production; and attractiveness of glowing fungi to flying insects. Basidiomes glowed continuously day and night, and were present in winter (June-July) when insect abundance was low. To assess attractiveness, we deployed sticky-traps in open woodland in the absence of light pollution, in Treatment (baited with fresh bioluminescent O. nidiformis) and Control pairs, for 480 trap-hours on moonless nights. There was no statistical difference in mean insect abundance between Treatment and Control traps (mean 0.33 and 0.54 individuals per trap night, respectively). To interpret these results, we provide a brief review of competing hypotheses for fungal bioluminescence, and conclude that for some fungi, bioluminescence may be an incidental by-product of metabolism rather than conferring any selective advantage. It is possible that the role of bioluminescence differs among evolutionary lineages of fungi and/or with attributes of their growth environments that could affect spore dispersal, such as wind and insect abundance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 33%
Student > Bachelor 3 20%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 20%
Physics and Astronomy 2 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 7%
Environmental Science 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2019.
All research outputs
#667,358
of 14,747,541 outputs
Outputs from IMA Fungus
#2
of 123 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,327
of 350,294 outputs
Outputs of similar age from IMA Fungus
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,747,541 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 123 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,294 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them