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Aphasia rehabilitation in Australia: Current practices, challenges and future directions

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
17 tweeters

Citations

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52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Aphasia rehabilitation in Australia: Current practices, challenges and future directions
Published in
International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, June 2013
DOI 10.3109/17549507.2013.794474
Pubmed ID
Authors

Miranda Rose, Alison Ferguson, Emma Power, Leanne Togher, Linda Worrall

Abstract

This study reports on current aphasia rehabilitation practices of speech-language pathologists in Australia. A 30-item web-based survey targeted approaches to aphasia rehabilitation, education, discharge, follow-up practices, counselling, interventions to improve communication access, community aphasia support services, and challenges to practice. One hundred and eighty-eight surveys were completed representing ~33% of the potential target population, with 58.5% urban and 41.5% rural participants across all states and territories. Respondents reported embracing a wide variety of approaches to aphasia rehabilitation; however, significant challenges in providing aphasia management in acute and residential care were identified. Low levels of knowledge and confidence were reported for both culturally and linguistically diverse clients and discourse approaches. Group and intensive services were under-utilized and clinicians reported inflexible funding models as major barriers to implementation. Few clinicians work directly in the community to improve communicative access for people with aphasia. Despite the chronic nature of aphasia, follow-up practices are limited and client re-entry to services is restricted. Counselling is a high frequency practice in aphasia rehabilitation, but clinicians report being under-prepared for the role. Respondents repeatedly cited lack of resources (time, space, materials) as a major challenge to effective service provision. Collective advocacy is required to achieve system level changes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 3%
Unknown 59 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 36%
Student > Bachelor 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Unspecified 4 7%
Other 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 15 25%
Psychology 13 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 15%
Linguistics 8 13%
Social Sciences 6 10%
Other 10 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2014.
All research outputs
#993,453
of 11,465,470 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
#74
of 438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,236
of 133,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,465,470 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 133,913 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them