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Is there a Role for Genetic Counselors in Prenatal Paternity Testing? – an Assessment Based on Audit of 13 years of Clinical Experience in South Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Genetic Counseling, July 2016
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Title
Is there a Role for Genetic Counselors in Prenatal Paternity Testing? – an Assessment Based on Audit of 13 years of Clinical Experience in South Australia
Published in
Journal of Genetic Counseling, July 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10897-016-9994-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate E. Riley, Hayley Salvemini, Eric Haan, Lara Fitzgerald, Kirsty Stallard, Sarah Borrie, Electra Pontikinas, Anne Baxendale

Abstract

The role of genetic counselors in prenatal paternity testing has not been widely studied in the genetic counseling literature. In South Australia, the genetic counselors of the State's public sector clinical genetics service are the primary contact point for women seeking information and testing, also coordinating the testing process. This has provided the opportunity to review all prenatal paternity testing performed in the State over a 13 year period and to consider the role played by the genetic counselor. We explored the reasons why women requested prenatal paternity testing and whether the genetic counselor was an appropriate health professional to facilitate this testing for women. The study had two parts, an audit of the clinical genetics files of 160 women who requested prenatal paternity testing between March 2001 and March 2014, and qualitative interviews of genetic counselors, clinical geneticists, obstetricians and social workers with involvement in this area. The audit determined that in 69.9 % of cases the long-term partner was the father of the pregnancy, for 23.7 % the short-term or other partner was the father and for 6.4 % the paternity results were not known by the genetic counselor. For 45.5 % of women whose long-term partner was excluded as the father, the women chose to have a termination of pregnancy. The results of the qualitative interviews yielded five major themes: accessibility of testing, role of the genetic counselor, social and relationship issues, decision making in pregnancy and emotional issues. We conclude that the genetic counselor is an appropriate health professional to facilitate prenatal paternity testing. Genetic counselors did not view their role as significantly different from a request for prenatal testing for another indication.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Student > Master 7 21%
Other 5 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 15%
Social Sciences 5 15%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 March 2017.
All research outputs
#5,049,230
of 9,264,233 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#383
of 588 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,905
of 314,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#17
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,264,233 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 588 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,815 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.