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Viral Eukaryogenesis: Was the Ancestor of the Nucleus a Complex DNA Virus?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Molecular Evolution, September 2001
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 1,262)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
149 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
165 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Viral Eukaryogenesis: Was the Ancestor of the Nucleus a Complex DNA Virus?
Published in
Journal of Molecular Evolution, September 2001
DOI 10.1007/s002390010215
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip John Livingstone Bell

Abstract

In the theory of viral eukaryogenesis I propose here, the eukaryotic nucleus evolved from a complex DNA virus. It is proposed that the virus established a persistent presence in the cytoplasm of a methanogenic mycoplasma and evolved into the eukaryotic nucleus by acquiring a set of essential genes from the host genome and eventually usurping its role. It is proposed that several characteristic features of the eukaryotic nucleus derive from its viral ancestry. These include mRNA capping, linear chromosomes, and separation of transcription from translation. In the model, phagocytosis and other membrane fusion-based processes are derived from viral membrane fusion processes and evolved in concert with the nucleus. The coevolution of phagocytosis and the nucleus rendered much of the host archaeal genome redundant since the protoeukaryote could obtain raw materials and energy by engulfing bacterial syntrophs/prey. This redundancy allowed loss of the archaeal chromosome, generating an organism with eukaryotic features. The evolution of phagocytosis allowed the eukaryotes to be the first organisms to occupy the niche of predator.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 165 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 3 2%
Germany 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Norway 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 153 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 30 18%
Researcher 29 18%
Student > Master 27 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 13%
Professor 11 7%
Other 32 19%
Unknown 15 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 78 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 4%
Chemistry 4 2%
Other 19 12%
Unknown 24 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2020.
All research outputs
#753,140
of 16,023,308 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Molecular Evolution
#15
of 1,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,084
of 158,727 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Molecular Evolution
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,023,308 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,262 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,727 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them