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High density lipoprotein as a source of cholesterol for adrenal steroidogenesis: a study in individuals with low plasma HDL-C

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Lipid Research, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
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Title
High density lipoprotein as a source of cholesterol for adrenal steroidogenesis: a study in individuals with low plasma HDL-C
Published in
Journal of Lipid Research, March 2013
DOI 10.1194/jlr.p033449
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. E. Bochem, A. G. Holleboom, J. A. Romijn, M. Hoekstra, G. M. Dallinga-Thie, M. M. Motazacker, G. K. Hovingh, J. A. Kuivenhoven, E. S. G. Stroes, Bochem AE, Holleboom AG, Romijn JA, Hoekstra M, Dallinga-Thie GM, Motazacker MM, Hovingh GK, Kuivenhoven JA, Stroes ES, Andrea E. Bochem, Adriaan G. Holleboom, Johannes A. Romijn, Menno Hoekstra, Geesje M. Dallinga-Thie, Mahdi M. Motazacker, G. Kees Hovingh, Jan A. Kuivenhoven, Erik S. G. Stroes

Abstract

Few studies have addressed the delivery of lipoprotein-derived cholesterol to the adrenals for steroid production in humans. While there is evidence against a role for low-density lipoprotein (LDL), it is unresolved whether high density lipoprotein (HDL) contributes to adrenal steroidogenesis. To study this, steroid hormone profiles in urine were assessed in male subjects suffering from functional mutations in ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) (n = 24), lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) (n = 40), as well as in 11 subjects with low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) without ABCA1/LCAT mutations. HDL-C levels were 39% lower in the ABCA1, LCAT, and low HDL-C groups compared with controls (all P < 0.001). In all groups with low HDL-C levels, urinary excretion of 17-ketogenic steroids was reduced by 33%, 27%, and 32% compared with controls (all P < 0.04). In seven carriers of either type of mutation, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation did not reveal differences from normolipidemic controls. In conclusion, this study shows that basal but not stimulated corticosteroid metabolism is attenuated in subjects with low HDL-C, irrespective of its molecular origin. These findings lend support to a role for HDL as a cholesterol donor for basal adrenal steroidogenesis in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 43%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Professor 1 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 43%
Unspecified 3 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Computer Science 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2014.
All research outputs
#3,553,310
of 8,674,002 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Lipid Research
#683
of 1,518 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,197
of 125,439 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Lipid Research
#8
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,674,002 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,518 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 125,439 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.