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Physician tobacco screening and advice to quit among U.S. adolescents – National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2013

Overview of attention for article published in Tobacco Induced Diseases, January 2017
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Title
Physician tobacco screening and advice to quit among U.S. adolescents – National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2013
Published in
Tobacco Induced Diseases, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12971-016-0107-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lauren Collins, Sabrina L. Smiley, Rakiya A. Moore, Amanda L. Graham, Andrea C. Villanti

Abstract

Initiating tobacco use in adolescence increases the risk of nicotine dependence and continued smoking. Physician screening for tobacco use increases the odds of physicians intervening with patients who smoke; However, without appropriate follow-through by the physician, screening for tobacco use is not enough to significantly increase cessation rates. Given the critical phase of development adolescence poses in tobacco use and evidence that physician intervention improves adult cessation efforts, we sought to examine physician tobacco use screening and advice to quit among adolescents (12-17 years). Using data from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), we examined the prevalence and correlates of tobacco use screening in adolescent respondents who reported visiting their physician within the past year (N = 12,798). Multivariable logistic regression analyses explored the relationship between tobacco use screening and physician advice to quit in a sub-set of the sample who reported on physician advice to quit (n = 1,868), controlling for sociodemographics, cigarette use, and substance use and screening. Only 49% of adolescents who visited a physician within the past year reported being screened for tobacco use. Adolescents who were screened by their physician were predominantly female (56.6%), White (60.1%), in late adolescence (83.0%), and covered by private health insurance (63.8%). Screening for tobacco use was highly correlated with physician advice to quit smoking, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics and cigarette use; this relationship was attenuated, but remained significant, after screening for alcohol and marijuana were added to the model. Hispanic adolescents were significantly less likely to receive physician advice to quit in all multivariable models. Our findings suggest missed opportunities for youth tobacco use prevention and cessation efforts in the clinical setting. Further research is needed to better facilitate an open dialogue on tobacco use between physicians and their adolescent patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 11 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 27%
Social Sciences 6 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 12%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2017.
All research outputs
#6,829,995
of 8,963,105 outputs
Outputs from Tobacco Induced Diseases
#139
of 170 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,975
of 308,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tobacco Induced Diseases
#4
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,963,105 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 170 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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